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10 Tips to use Python os Module

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Python os module is a powerful tool that allows you to do many things, including manipulating files and directories, reading and modifying environment variables, and checking the status of your system. In this blog post, we will discuss 10 tips for mastering the os module. These tips will help you use Python os module more effectively and efficiently. Let’s get started!

Use Python os.path module to manipulate files and directories

The os.path module is a powerful tool that allows you to easily manipulate files and directories. For example, you can use the os.path.join() function to join two or more strings together and create a new pathname. You can also use the os.path.split() function to split a pathname into its parent directory and the base name of that pathname.

>>> import os
>>> path = “/home”
>>> print(os.path.join(path, “User/Desktop”, “file.txt”))
/home/User/Desktop/file.txt

>>> import os
>>> path = ‘/home/User/Desktop/file.txt’
>>> os.path.split(path)
(‘/home/User/Desktop’, ‘file.txt’)

Use Python os module’s environment variables

The os module has several environment variables that are useful for accessing system information, such as your current working directory or user name on Unix systems (or domain name on Windows systems). You can use the os.getenv() function to get an environment variable from your system, or you can use the os.putenv() method if you want to set an environment variable for yourself only (not all users on that computer).

>>> os.getenv(‘HOME’)
‘/home/dba’

Use Python os module’s file-opening methods

The os module has several file-opening methods that you can use to open files for reading or writing. For example, the os.open() function allows you to open a file in read mode, while the os.write() function lets you write data to a file. Be sure to check out the os module’s documentation for a complete list of file-opening methods.

Use Python os module’s stat() function to get information about files and directories

The os module’s stat() function allows you to get information about a file or directory, such as its size, permissions, and timestamp. This can be useful for determining whether a file has been modified since the last time it was opened.

>>> os.stat(‘/home/dba’)
os.stat_result(st_mode=16877, st_ino=1296294, st_dev=51713, st_nlink=13, st_uid=1002, st_gid=1002, st_size=4096, st_atime=1645326289, st_mtime=1645293754, st_ctime=1645293754)

Use Python os module’s system commands to change file permissions and ownership (chmod, chown)

The os module has several system commands that allow you to change file permissions or ownership on Unix systems. For example, the chmod command lets you set new file permissions (such as read-only or executable). The chown command lets you change the owner of a file, which is useful if you want your program to run with different users’ privileges than what they currently have.

>>> os.system(‘chomod 777 test.txt’)

Use Python os module’s system commands to make and copy files (mkdir, cp)

The os module has several system commands that allow you to make and copy files. For example, the mkdir command lets you create a new directory with the specified name and mode (such as read-only or executable). The cp command lets you copy files from one location to another. This can be useful for backing up your data before making changes to it.

Use Python os module’s system commands to remove files and directories (rm, rmdir)

The os module has several system commands that allow you to remove files and directories. For example, the rm command lets you delete a file or directory with the specified name. The rmdir command lets you delete a directory with the specified name. Be careful when using these commands, as they can easily remove important files or directories from your system!

Use Python os module’s functions to query file information (isfile, isdir)

The os module has several functions that allow you to query file information. For example, the isfile() function checks to see if a file exists, while the isdir() function checks to see if a directory exists. These functions can be useful for verifying that certain files or directories exist before attempting to use them.

>>> os.path.isfile(‘test.txt’)
True
>>> os.path.isdir(‘test.txt’)
False

Use Python os module’s symbolic links functions (symlink, readlink)

The os module has two functions that allow you to work with symbolic links. The symlink() function lets you create a new symbolic link, while the readlink() function reads the value of a symbolic link. Symbolic links can be useful for linking different parts of your filesystem together, or for creating shortcuts to files and directories.

Use Python os module’s functions to change your current working directory (chdir, getcwd)

The os module has two functions that allow you to change directories. The chdir() function changes the current directory while getcwd() returns the name of the current directory. These functions can be useful if you need to access files or directories that are located in a different directory than the one you’re currently in.

>>> os.getcwd()
‘/home/dba’
>>> os.chdir(‘/tmp/’)
>>> os.getcwd()
‘/tmp’

 

That’s all for now! Be sure to check out the os module’s documentation for more information on its functions and system commands. Happy coding! 🙂

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